Friday, April 3, 2015

Day dreamer...

courtesy morguefile.com
Days like today offer infinite possibilities.  At least that's what I say to myself when I first wake up. This is, officially, Easter Break, which was shortened by mother nature's wintery wrath to a 3 day weekend.   I develop a list of great intentions, sometimes adding things to the list that I've already accomplished, just so I can cross them off, and  pencil in some time that is fun time just for me.   

I went to bed last night with big plans, and woke up feeling like I'd gone one too many rounds with Brock Lesnar.  Swollen eyes, throbbing sinuses, and a throat that feels like a chokehold, courtesy Roman Reigns.

So maybe that was a little more WWE than any anticipated, but I've become well-versed in the lingo of late.  (And by well-versed, I can tell you that the WWE used to be the WWF until the Save the Giraffe people were offended, as well as fake my way through a few text conversations about the Royal Rumble with a colleague.)

So instead of a 10,000 step walk on a sunny day with a friend, and the rest of my list, I made a quick trip to the Country Store for dinner ingredients and the necessary materials for the two celebrations over the weekend, and had lunch with a former student.  I dumped in some laundry, and spent the rest of the day perusing the Benedict Carey book, along with another Amazon suggestion from earlier this week, How to Create a Mind.

Daydreaming vs. Reality.

Despite my ineffective time-management today, there is actually sound research to support a day like today, arguing the value of daydreaming and lack of focus as a solid excuse for some serious incubation.  Sitting over a leisurely lunch with Austin talking about education and getting to view his portfolio of lessons and units he has developed was so much fun.  In fact, any time a teacher can stop and talk to a recent graduate, we become students of what is being taught,and adjusting our own philosophies of education as we balance what we know as reality with what newbie teachers have learned.

Carey outlines a few tips, some of which seemingly have no place in my world.  Tip #1 - Organize and Manage Time.  HA!  See how effective I am at that?  (Or shall I argue that I do that for a living -- its called LESSON PLANS -- and I am taking time off now because Tip #2 insists that I do!)

Tip #2 - Take Breaks.  Clearly I'm an overachiever.

Given that the article suggests many wonderful tips, and I'm busy incubating, I encourage you to go visit the article yourself.   
 You'll find at least one tip that will support whatever you plan to do this long weekend, with the added benefit of arguing that your actions are supported by actual research.